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Feinsten Grows Testy Over Accusations of Left-Wing Pressure to Oppose Trump Nominees: ‘That’s Your Interpretation’

Sen. Dianne Feinstein (D., Calif.) took exception Sunday to CBS host Margaret Brennan's question about perceived left-wing pressure in her home state to oppose President Donald Trump's nominees as she seeks re-election in November. On "Face The Nation," Feinstein discussed her issues with supporting Gina Haspel to be the next CIA Director in place of Mike Pompeo, who has been nominated by President Donald Trump to be the next secretary of state. Feinstein, as other Democrats have, said she opposed Haspel's position on enhanced interrogation but stressed she wouldn't make up her mind on Haspel until after her confirmation hearing. Brennan said it sounded like Feinstein was leaning toward a "no" even though Haspel had strong support from within the CIA. "There are some in the intelligence community who are looking to you as a very key vote here … There are those who are questioning whether it's possible for you personally to be supportive of her, given the pressures you are feeling from progressives back in your home state of California right now, that you just can't afford to support any Trump nominee," Brennan said. "Can you explain how you're weighing those things?" "That isn't correct," Feinstein said. "Obviously that's your interpretation of it, and you're welcome to that interpretation." Brennan responded that wasn't her own interpretation. "I care about who is head of the CIA, and I'm going to do my due diligence, have a chance to ask her questions in the public arena, and will do just that, and then will make up my mind whether I believe she's an appropriate person to head this agency," Feinstein said. Feinstein has angered progressives in the party with her stances on national security issues, in addition to a badly received remark last year that Trump deserved "patience." She failed to get the state Democratic party's endorsement last month, an unusual rebuke for a sitting senator, and her progressive opponent State Sen. Kevin de León also recently earned the endorsement of left-wing billionaire Tom Steyer. Nevertheless, Feinstein remains in a dominant position to clinch the Democratic nomination. She is seeking her fifth full term. The post Feinsten Grows Testy Over Accusations of Left-Wing Pressure to Oppose Trump Nominees: ‘That’s Your Interpretation’ appeared first on Washington Free Beacon.

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Cotton Rips Democrats Opposing Pompeo Because They Fear Blowback from the Left: ‘Shameful Political Behavior’

Sen. Tom Cotton (R., Ark.) blasted Senate Democrats opposing Mike Pompeo's nomination as secretary of state, saying Sunday they feared blowback from the left and were engaged in "shameful political behavior." Cotton referred to Pompeo as someone "who will soon be Secretary Pompeo" earlier in his interview with CBS host Margaret Brennan. Cotton said Pompeo was "committed to diplomatic solutions everywhere" and knew the credible threat of military force was key to obtaining such solutions. President Donald Trump tapped Pompeo to take over at the State Department after he fired Rex Tillerson last month. However, after sailing to confirmation last year, Pompeo has earned only one Democratic "yes" vote so far in Sen. Heidi Heitkamp (N.D.). "The Democrats, especially on the Foreign Relations Committee, are really engaged in shameful political behavior," Cotton said. He noted 14 Democrats and one independent who caucuses with the Democrats voted for Pompeo to be CIA Director last year and none of them, to his knowledge, had criticized his handling of that position. "Ultimately, the secretary of state is conducting diplomacy on behalf of the president. Most of these Democrats don't have a problem with Mike Pompeo," Cotton said. "They are still struggling to get over the election of Donald Trump in 2016, or frankly, they face elections this year in 2018, and they're afraid of scaring the MoveOn.org or Code Pink crowd. It's really shameful behavior." Democrats like Sens. Tim Kaine (Va.), Dianne Feinstein (Calif.) and Jeanne Shaheen (N.H.) have flipped from supporting Pompeo last year to opposing him this year, citing reasons ranging from his conservative social views to claiming he is opposed to diplomacy. The post Cotton Rips Democrats Opposing Pompeo Because They Fear Blowback from the Left: ‘Shameful Political Behavior’ appeared first on Washington Free Beacon.

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Perez Defends DNC Lawsuit Against Trump Campaign: ‘We Can Walk and Chew Gum’

Democratic National Committee chair Tom Perez defended the DNC's civil lawsuit against the Donald Trump campaign Sunday from criticism that includes Democratic lawmakers and strategists. The DNC filed the lawsuit Friday in federal court, accusing the Trump campaign of conspiring with Russian agents and WikiLeaks. The New York Times reported the suit came as a surprise to even Democratic Party leaders. ABC's George Stephanopoulos quoted former Obama chief strategist David Axelrod calling the lawsuit "spectacularly ill-timed," saying it helps President Trump portray the Robert Mueller Russia probe as a partisan vendetta. Perez defended himself by saying that a civil suit needs to be filed within the statue of limitations and the DNC has a strong case. He also said it is important to "deter misconduct." "It's hard to win elections when you have interference in elections. And they've done it with impunity. I'm concerned it will happen again. That's why we did it now," Perez said. Stephanopoulos pushed Perez, asking if this type of lawsuit is a bad idea with the 2018 midterms coming up. Some Democrats think so, including Intelligence Committee member Rep. Jackie Speier (Calif.) and Sen. Claire McCaskill (Mo.), who faces a tough re-election battle this November. McCaskill called the lawsuit a distraction, but Perez told Stephanopoulos "we can walk and chew gum." "We're fighting for good jobs, good teacher pay, good education. Health care for all," Perez said before adding that he's also "fighting to preserve our democracy." Trump mocked the lawsuit Friday as being filed by "Obstructionist Democrats." Just heard the Campaign was sued by the Obstructionist Democrats. This can be good news in that we will now counter for the DNC Server that they refused to give to the FBI, the Debbie Wasserman Schultz Servers and Documents held by the Pakistani mystery man and Clinton Emails. — Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) April 20, 2018 The post Perez Defends DNC Lawsuit Against Trump Campaign: ‘We Can Walk and Chew Gum’ appeared first on Washington Free Beacon.

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Macron: I’m Here to Make France Great Again

French President Emmanuel Macron quipped he's trying to make France "great again" in response to criticism he's governed as an authoritarian, a nod to the famous "Make America Great Campaign" slogan of President Donald Trump. Macron is making an official state visit to the United States beginning Monday to celebrate nearly 250 years of U.S.-French relations. "Fox News Sunday" host Chris Wallace noted some in the French press have compared Macron to Napoleon and King Louis XIV since he took office in 2017. Although the 40-year-old Macron is viewed as a progressive stalwart abroad, the Washington Post reports he's seen as a "liberal strongman" in his own country. Discontent with him has grown in France for governing in a perceived autocratic fashion and being beholden to the rich, and critics have taken exception to his efforts to reduce the powers of Parliament. A recent poll showed only 42 percent support for his policies in France. "Do you ever feel you need to guard against being arrogant?" Wallace asked. "Definitely," Macron said. "But having authority, deciding, being aware of all the consequences of your decision, and thinking that you have to stick to your decision to deliver when it's good for the country, is not the same as being authoritarian or being arrogant." "I'm here to serve my people in my country and make it great again, as somebody I know very well could say," Macron added. "That's the whole story, and make it great again means delivering good results, having more unity for the country, and being fair with the people." Macron said ahead of his visit that he and Trump have a "very special relationship" due to what he says are their outsider statuses. "We have a very special relationship because both of us are probably the maverick of the systems on both sides," he said. "I think President Trump’s election was unexpected in your country, and probably my election was unexpected in my country. And we are not part of the classical political system." While the leader of the oldest ally of the U.S. and Trump have appeared friendly for the cameras, they differ on several significant issues, among them the Iran nuclear deal, Syria, the Paris climate accords and Trump's recent steel and aluminum tariffs. The post Macron: I’m Here to Make France Great Again appeared first on Washington Free Beacon.

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Sanders Hasn’t Decided on White House Bid, Says He’ll Support Whoever Has Best Chance of Beating Trump

Sen. Bernie Sanders (I., Vt.) said in an interview airing Sunday he will support whichever candidate has the best chance of defeating President Donald Trump in 2020, even if it's not himself. MSNBC's Al Sharpton interviewed Sanders at the National Action Network conference and asked Sanders—one of numerous rumored 2020 Democratic contenders—if he'd decided to run for president again. "I have not made that decision," Sanders said. "What will make you make the decision?" Sharpton asked. "I want more than anything to see that Trump is defeated, and what I will assess at the proper time is who is the best candidate, and I mean that sincerely," Sanders said. "Everybody has an ego. I have an ego. But what is most important for this country is that we come together, to transform America … and to defeat Donald Trump. "And at the appropriate time, right now my focus is on 2018, doing everything I can to see the Democrats regain control of the House, maybe even the Senate … But at the appropriate time, we're going to look around us and say, ‘Which candidate is the best candidate to defeat Trump?' "And you'll go with that?" Sharpton asked. "Yes," Sanders said. Sanders said he believed Democrats "will be supportive" of him if they feel he's the best candidate to defeat Trump. Sanders mounted a surprisingly sturdy bid for the Democratic nomination in 2016 against frontrunner Hillary Clinton, winning 22 caucuses and primaries. The post Sanders Hasn’t Decided on White House Bid, Says He’ll Support Whoever Has Best Chance of Beating Trump appeared first on Washington Free Beacon.

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Gillibrand: The Country’s Ready for a Woman President

Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand (D., N.Y.) said she believes the country is ready for a woman president, although she said she was not "planning" on a 2020 bid for the White House. In an interview with MSNBC host Al Sharpton at the National Action Network annual conference, Gillibrand said she was focused on her 2018 re-election bid to the U.S. Senate. "But after '18, if you're re-elected, would you consider running?" Sharpton asked. "Well, I'm definitely not planning on it," she said. "I'm really focused only on '18." Sharpton, who also interviewed Sens. Elizabeth Warren (D., Mass.) and Kamala Harris (D., Calif.) for "PoliticsNation" on Sunday, asked Gillibrand if she thought the country was ready for a woman president. "I do," she said. "Hillary [Clinton] won the popular vote. The country's ready, and I think that what they really want is a leader who speaks from conviction, speaks from their heart with great authenticity and passion, and that could be a man or a woman. So I believe the country is ready. It's just about someone who is going to really share their values and fight for what they care deeply about." Gillibrand has come to national prominence with her platforms on sexual assault; she was the first U.S. Senator to call on Sen. Al Franken (D., Minn.) to resign over multiple accusations of sexual harassment. She also said she thought Bill Clinton should have resigned from the presidency over the Monica Lewinsky affair, although she made that comment nearly 20 years after the fact. Gillibrand has become one of the most reliably liberal voices in Congress after taking on more conservative positions a decade ago while representing an upstate New York district, particularly on guns and immigration. She told "60 Minutes" she was "embarrassed" and "ashamed" by these prior stances. The post Gillibrand: The Country’s Ready for a Woman President appeared first on Washington Free Beacon.

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Liberal Civil War

Planned Parenthood of the Rocky Mountains is fighting a unionization attempt from Service Employees International Union, despite the labor giant's emphatic support for the nation's largest abortion provider. In November the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB), the agency in charge of union elections and settling workplace disputes, granted SEIU Local 105's petition to hold an election for joining the union at several abortion clinics in Colorado. Planned Parenthood objected to the organization campaign and appealed to the Republican-controlled board. It disputed the fact that SEIU was attempting to organize a micro-unit and improperly excluded Planned Parenthood of the Rocky Mountains (PPRM) clinics in Nevada and New Mexico in an effort to tilt the scales of the vote. "The [NLRB regional director] failed to consider or disregarded community of interest factors long recognized by Board rules, policies, and precedent," PPRM lawyers said in a filing. "The principles of freedom of choice, collective expression, and efficient and stable collective bargaining … will be best served by the employer-wide or overall unit sought by PPRM." The board sided with Planned Parenthood in a 2-1 decision. Trump appointees Marvin Kaplan and William Emanuel said the unit should be reevaluated. In December, the board reversed an Obama-era decision that allowed unions to organize segments of a company, rather than hold elections across the entire workplace, overturning long-standing precedent against micro-units. Planned Parenthood argued that the SEIU's attempt to organize nurses in a specific territory ran afoul of the Trump board's decision. A spokesman for PPRM declined comment, saying the organization does not discuss ongoing legal matters. SEIU Local 105 did not respond to requests for comment. The dispute represents a rift between two of the key players in the Democratic Party. The two groups have been allies in the past. SEIU has given Planned Parenthood $190,000 since 2007 in payments classified as political activities or "contributions, gifts, and grants," according to federal labor filings. Planned Parenthood's political arm, meanwhile, sent more than $290,000 to SEIU councils in Missouri and Washington State during that time. SEIU president Mary Kay Henry defended Planned Parenthood after undercover videos showed clinic workers candidly discussing the sale of baby body parts. "We stand united with our allies at Planned Parenthood, champions of quality health care and a cornerstone of vital services to millions of Americans for decades," she said in a release. "It's time for the leadership of both political parties in Congress to stand with women and against these vicious attacks on Planned Parenthood." The ties between Planned Parenthood and SEIU run deeper than money. Former PP honcho Cecile Richards is married to Kirk Adams, the longtime head of SEIU's health care branch. In 2014, Planned Parenthood hired SEIU executive Ellen Golombek to lead an initiative to align the abortionist with other leading liberal groups. Planned Parenthood is not alone in its opposition to unionization despite its liberal identity. Media Matters for America opposed SEIU's attempt to unionize its workforce and pushed for a secret ballot election despite publishing articles condemning such elections as oppressive to workers. Peter List, a former union official turned labor watchdog, said liberal groups are guilty of hypocrisy when they ally with unions publicly, but oppose organized labor in their own workforce. "It's ironic, insofar as Planned Parenthood relies heavily on the SEIU to provide the abortion provider with financial and public support, that the relationship is not reciprocal," he said. "However, like the SEIU's management itself being somewhat hostile towards its own staff being unionized, it is not uncommon for progressive organizations like Planned Parenthood to claim progressive values on the one hand, while acting like 19th-Century bosses when their staffs want to unionize on the other hand." The union argued that the clinics do not share management and operate largely independent of one another across state lines. Workers in the 14 Colorado clinics are subject to similar management and share a "community of interests" because of their interactions. SEIU said these interactions rarely cross into Nevada and New Mexico. "The absence of any interchange of employees, lack of geographic proximity, lack of any functional integration of operations and separate first and second level supervisors between the non-contiguous states of Nevada and Colorado where the appropriate unit exists is reason enough to reject the Employer's request," the union argued in an NLRB filing. "While the employees in the employer-wide unit also share common skills, duties and terms of employment, the indisputable evidence shows no employee interchange between the appropriate unit and Nevada and almost no interchange with New Mexico." Planned Parenthood relied on the support of the Republican majority to contest SEIU's organization bid. NLRB Democrat board member Lauren McFerran rejected the abortion provider's argument. She said the Colorado-specific vote was "reasonably" determined and that PPRM's request to include clinic workers in Nevada "could be prohibitive" given the distance between the clinics. "In many, if not most, instances, such daunting geographic barriers could be prohibitive to employees’ right to choose and engage in collective bargaining," she said. "Despite the Employer’s failure to posit other alternatives, the [NLRB] Regional Director made an independent unit determination that gave geographic proximity the weight it deserved alongside the other relevant factors for multi-facility unit determinations." The matter will now go before the agency's full five-member board, which Republicans control 3-2. The post Liberal Civil War appeared first on Washington Free Beacon.

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Days of Wine and Roses

Alcohol is the lubricant of social interaction: We rub against each other like rough-cut gears, the burred ratchets of unpolished clockwork, and without a little oil to ease our way, we'd grind one another down to raw metal. Then, too, alcohol is a flavoring—something splashed on life to add a little zest. A dollop of wine deglazes the caramelized drippings and draws out the essences. A measure of beer enlivens a batter. A jigger of brandy warms a dessert. And why not? Liquor makes the banter seem wittier, the company more charming, the party more exciting. For that matter, alcohol is an emotional regulator: a mood restorative, an attitude adjustor. A martini can pick you. A Manhattan can calm you down. A beer can steady your nerves. A shot of rye can drown your sorrows. The taste of absinthe lets us imagine the experience of decadent French poets. The swirl of bourbon, the slight viscosity as it clings to the glass, gives us clues to the thought of highflying American novelists. Of course, along the way, alcohol eats our brain cells and claws at our liver till it's a scarred and fibrous lump of tissue. The belly gains the hard swell of ascites. The thin veins in the esophagus start to leak. The hands begin to tremble. The memory begins to fade. Drunks may imagine their friendships as rich and interesting, filled with drama. But to the nondrinking observer, the alcoholic's human relationships look merely impoverished and unpleasant. The result is the opposite of unique and dramatic. Just predictably sloppy and expectedly dull: an amateur production of Hedda Gabler on a rainy Wednesday evening in Sioux City, Iowa. Drinking may be fun, but drunkenness is a race between the boring and the disgusting, with death closing in fast on the frontrunners. The dullness is what Leslie Jamison tries to address in The Recovering: Intoxication and Its Aftermath, her new book about her alcoholism, and it proves a long, tedious journey up from the bottom of a bottle. Jamison started out with gifts worth envying. The daughter of wealthy academics, she grew up in a ritzy neighborhood in Los Angeles—and she would go on to collect credentials like girl-scout badges of contemporary American meritocracy: an undergraduate degree from Harvard, followed by an MFA from the Iowa Writers' Workshop, followed by a Ph.D. in literature from Yale (where she wrote a dissertation on writers and alcohol that she mines for large portions of The Recovering). Along the way there were trips to Italy, visits to Latin America, and the kind of fellowships and opportunities American academia grants to those for whom it predicts future success. Her first novel, The Gin Closet, appeared in 2010, when she was 27, and four years later a collection of her essays, The Empathy Exams, made the New York Times bestseller list. Now a professor at Columbia, she directs the nonfiction program at the School of the Arts. To her credit, Jamison fights hard to prevent The Recovering from descending into yet another tale of abuse and victimhood, the pattern of nearly every memoir published these days. So, for example, she relates the story of unwanted sex in Nicaragua. "I was giving him certain signals of consent," she notes, "but consent when you're drunk means something I still don't have a good language for. It was as if I'd already made myself available as someone without pride, and it would have been hypocritical to become someone different." She refuses to use the title of rape for something that happened "because I was drunk and because he didn't stop." So too, she admits, her childhood "was easier than most, and I ended up drinking anyway." But the narrative of the victim is difficult for a contemporary writer to avoid entirely. Though Jamison doesn't seek too deeply in the past for the causes of her later behavior, she does relate how she began cutting herself while a teenager, fasting herself into anorexia while an undergraduate, and obnubilating herself with booze as a graduate student. It was all supposed to make her interesting, she explains that she thought at the time. Dull people lead sober lives, lacking interesting flavors and moods. Even more to the point, she wanted to be an artist, and alcohol, she believed, fuels creativity and insight. Just look at Raymond Carver, John Cheever, John Berryman, dozens of other authors. Where would they be without the booze? What would they have written without the bottle? As a drunk, Malcolm Lowry wrote Under the Volcano (1947), a near classic of a drinking novel. When he tried to follow up his success with a tale of recovered sobriety, he could produce only an unpublished manuscript. Jamison hunts it down and finds it so boring that, she says, she began cheering for the main character to start drinking again. As far as her own attempts at being interesting go, Jamison developed an altogether ordinary inebriation that overdramatized everything. She seems to have been a mean drunk, even now describing cheating on her boyfriend as "explicable and unextraordinary." She wanted to drink life to the dregs, and the dregs are what she got, somehow imagining them the profound stuff of existence. And the suffering she felt—like the suffering she caused—seemed to her the very essence of reality. In other words, she was sure she was a deep and complicated person because pain surrounded her. In the 1962 film Days of Wine and Roses, Kirsten tries to explain her drinking by saying that, without alcohol, she "can't get over how dirty everything looks." The world seemed brighter and more interesting when she was drunk. For Leslie Jamison, however, it wasn't an improvement of the world she sought. It was she herself that she saw as brighter and more interesting. In one of the best sections of The Recovering, Jamison takes up Charles R. Jackson's 1944 novel, The Lost Weekend. She notes Jackson's drunkenness, his attempts at sobriety, and the relapse that lead to his suicide. A contrast develops with such writers as Jean Rhys, as Jamison argues that "the mythic male drunk manages a thrilling abandon—the reckless, self-destructive pursuit of truth," but "his female counterpart is more often understood as guilty of abandonment, the crime of failing at care." Even so, she rightly notes that The Lost Weekend is a neglected book we need to bring back into popular notice, for it is the first—and still possibly the best—novel that shows drinking realistically. Neither a mark of the demon rum nor a regular dosing with magical elixir for the artistic and the interesting, alcoholism in Jackson's novel is revealed as the boring, predictable, and mean-spirited thing it is. Perhaps Jamison is drawn to The Lost Weekend because she wanted to attempt in The Recovering an account of returning to sobriety that didn't have the shape of a Come-to-Jesus salvation story. While her notes about attending Alcoholics Anonymous meetings are wry and sharply observed, she is still involved in the self-dramatizing that she had while drinking. The Recovering is a little tedious. Part of the reason is that, at 544 pages, the book is a quarter too long, and part of the reason is that the seams show where she pasted in thoughts from her doctoral dissertation. But mostly The Recovering drags because drunkenness drags. The specific drunken incidents Jamison relates are predictable outcomes of her drinking, and the specific sober incidents she tells us are predictable outcomes of her not drinking. Both will bear some of the weight she tries to place on them, but not all of it. Still, The Recovering serves as a useful reminder. Drinking is exciting, exhilarating, and ecstatic. Drunkenness is merely dull—a dullness that rots the liver. Rots the brain. Rots the soul. The post Days of Wine and Roses appeared first on Washington Free Beacon.

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Mylan Executives Donate Big Money to Manchin

Executives at Mylan N.V., the pharmaceutical company that drew controversy for increasing the price of EpiPen devices nearly 400 percent, donated heavily to Democratic senator Joe Manchin's reelection campaign as the company planned to lay off more than 400 workers in his home state of West Virginia. Mylan—whose CEO, Heather Bresch, is Manchin's daughter—announced Friday that it will lay off 15 percent of the workforce at its manufacturing plant in Morgantown, W.Va. The plant, one of about 50 that Mylan has around the world, employs upwards of 3,000 West Virginians and is one of the state's largest employers. The majority of the layoffs will occur in the plant's operations division, which consists largely of hourly-waged workers. Mylan has confirmed that some of the employees will have recall rights, meaning they can potentially return to work after a specified amount of time if the company chooses to expand, while others will be offered buyout packages. In a statement provided to the Washington Free Beacon, Mylan blamed the changing pharmaceutical industry and evolving "regulatory expectations" for forcing the company to downsize its Morgantown plant. "As the industry has changed and regulatory expectations have continued to evolve, we've realized that our Morgantown plant needed to be rightsized to be less complex," Mylan said. "The right-sizing is consistent with discussions we are having with the U.S. Food and Drug Administration and is necessary in order to position the site as best we can for continued operations." The layoffs come on the heels of campaign finance disclosures showing that Mylan executives donated heavily to Manchin's reelection campaign this year. Individuals employed by Mylan gave $51,250 to the senator in the first quarter of 2018. This is on top of the $132,450 that Mylan employees and its political action committee have donated to Manchin since he entered the Senate in 2010. Mylan is the senator's second-largest source of federal campaign funds, according to the Center for Responsive Politics. Manchin, a centrist Democrat, is facing a tough reelection battle this year in a state that President Donald Trump carried easily over Hillary Clinton in 2016. Mylan did not respond to questions about when a final determination on the layoffs was made and whether any of the company's other facilities will experience similar layoffs. Alec Thomas, communications director for Rep. David McKinley (R., W.Va.), in whose congressional district the plant is located, told the Free Beacon that the news was shocking, especially since there was no prior indication that anything was wrong. "The announcement blindsided everyone, and frankly it's angering since we weren't given any notice or offered any insight into the rationale behind the layoffs," Thomas said. "The company mentioned an issue with the FDA. What is the issue and why didn't they come seek our help? Our office has been successful at helping constituents resolve issues with federal agencies, and would've done everything we could have to help resolve Mylan's, had it been brought to us." "These are good-paying jobs and we don't want to see them go," Thomas added. Mylan first drew criticism in 2016 after the company increased the price of EpiPen injectors, for which Mylan controlled 85 percent of the market share, to levels many considered unfair and even exploitive. The price for a two-pack EpiPen injector rose from around $100 in 2007, when Mylan first acquired the life-saving treatment, to over $600 in 2016. Bresch defended the price increases, and the rise in her own salary from $2.4 million in 2007 to almost $19 million in 2016, as being on par with increasing health care costs. The scrutiny surrounding the accusations of price-gouging led to an internal audit by the Department of Health and Human Services, which found Mylan may have overcharged taxpayers by $1.27 billion over a 10-year period. Mylan finalized a settlement with the federal government in August, agreeing to pay back $465 million for misclassifying the EpiPen as a generic brand to avoid paying Medicaid rebates. As part of the agreement, Mylan was required to enter into a corporate integrity agreement with the Department of Health and Human Services Office of Inspector General. Manchin came under fire after it was revealed that Mylan and its subsidiaries witnessed a sudden spike in government funding after Bresch took over as CEO in 2012. One subsidiary, Mylan Pharmaceuticals Inc., received only $13,815 from federal contracts between 2008 and 2010. The subsidiary did not receive any federal money in 2011 and 2012. In 2013, however, one year after Bresch took over as CEO, the subsidiary received $113,895 from federal contracts. Then in 2014, government funding dwarfed that of previous years, as the subsidiary raked in $1.5 million. Another subsidiary, Mylan Speciality L.P., only received $6,516 from government contracts between 2008 and 2012. One year after Bresch took the helm, however, the subsidiary garnered $1.3 million from the federal government. Amid the congressional investigation into Mylan, Manchin attempted to distance himself from the company, while encouraging his colleagues to be "open-minded and fair." Manchin's office did not return requests for comment for this story. The post Mylan Executives Donate Big Money to Manchin appeared first on Washington Free Beacon.

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North Korea Says It Will Stop Nuclear Tests, Abolish Test Site

By: Cynthia Kim and Soyoung Kim SEOUL (Reuters) – North Korea will suspend nuclear and missile tests effective immediately and abolish a nuclear test site in a bid to pursue economic growth and peace on the Korean peninsula, the North’s state media said on Saturday, ahead of planned summits with South Korea and the United States. North Korea leader Kim Jong Un said his country no longer needed to conduct nuclear tests or intercontinental ballistic missile tests because it has completed its goal of developing nuclear weapons, state media Korean Central News Agency (KCNA) said. "To guarantee suspension of nuclear tests in a transparent manner, the republic’s northern nuclear test site will be abolished," the KCNA said after Kim convened this year’s first plenary session of the Central Committee of the ruling Worker’s Party on Friday. "The overall projects of the party and the country will be geared towards building of a socialist economy, and all our efforts will be made towards it," the KCNA said. North Korea also said it would engage in talks with the international community, paving the way for the summit with South Korean President Moon Jae-in planned for next week and a meeting with U.S. President Donald Trump in late May or early June. Trump on Friday welcomed the statement and said he looked forward to a summit with Kim. "North Korea has agreed to suspend all Nuclear Tests and close up a major test site. This is very good news for North Korea and the World – big progress! Look forward to our Summit," Trump said on Twitter. North Korea has defended its nuclear and missile programs in the face of worldwide condemnation and sanctions as a necessary deterrent against perceived U.S. hostility. Tensions eased significantly after North Korea’s Kim called in a New Year’s speech for lower military tensions and improved ties with South Korea. It sent a delegation to the Winter Olympics held in South Korea and agreed to meet with Moon and Trump to discuss denuclearization of the Korean peninsula. The ruling party’s plenary meeting on Friday was convened to discuss "policy issues of a new stage" to meet the demands of the current "important historic period," the KCNA said. The post North Korea Says It Will Stop Nuclear Tests, Abolish Test Site appeared first on Washington Free Beacon.

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