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Dem Rep: Religious Adoption Agencies Akin to Jim Crow

A Democratic congressman compared the Trump administration’s religious liberty protections to Jim Crow era laws. Rep. Bobby Scott (D., Va.) asked Secretary of Health and Human Services Alex Azar if religious foster care agencies had the right to discriminate under conscience protections implemented by the administration. Scott repeatedly asked Azar if those agencies had a free pass on requirements to abide by civil rights laws at a Wednesday hearing before the House Committee on Education and the Workforce. "In the Loving v. Virginia case, the trial court justified the ban on interracial marriages by saying that ‘Almighty God created races and placed them on certain continents, but for the intervention of this arrangement there would be no cause for such marriages,'" Scott said. He went on to ask Azar if foster care agencies had the ability to deny interracial placements based on the trial court's ruling from almost 60 years ago. Azar responded by saying that Congress had already put in place antidiscrimination policies that would be strictly enforced. He indicated that faith-based adoption organizations had provided homes for poor and underprivileged children for decades. Preventing religious organizations from participating in adoption or foster care programs would punish children in poverty. "We don't believe this is an ‘either-or' situation as you phrase it—of this discrimination versus that discrimination," Azar said, adding that the agency would work to balance religious liberty to "allow states to have the ability to use a variety of organizations to ensure the safety of protecting children." The Trump administration implemented a "conscience and religious freedom" division within the Department of Health and Human Services in January. Pro-life and religious liberty groups have praised the administration's efforts to protect religious freedom, while many LGBT advocates say their concerns are being ignored. Azar's testimony came on the heels of a decision by the city of Philadelphia to cut off Catholic Social Services from foster family placements because of its religious beliefs about marriage despite the city's claim that it faces a massive shortage of available foster homes. The organization and several foster parents filed a lawsuit May 14 against the city alleging religious discrimination, pointing to the fact that no complaints had been lodged against the charity. Their lawyer, Becket Fund president Mark Rienzi, said Philadelphia mayor Jim Kenney and his administration were putting their political goals before the needs of children. "The city is leaving homes empty, in order to pick this culture war for political reasons," Rienzi told the Washington Free Beacon at the time of the suit. "It's really mind blowing to think they'd do this to kids. That's just vindictive." Scott's exchange also followed a major victory for religious liberty before the Supreme Court earlier this week. The court ruled 7-2 on Monday that Colorado regulators unconstitutionally discriminated against the religious beliefs of a Christian baker who declined to participate in a gay wedding. Hiram Sasser, general counsel for First Liberty Institute, said Scott's attitude toward religious liberty mirrored that of the Colorado Civil Rights Commission. "It's a shame that Rep. Scott didn't get the message that the Supreme Court sent to the nation earlier this week," Sasser said. "The Constitution leaves no room for government hostility to religion." The post Dem Rep: Religious Adoption Agencies Akin to Jim Crow appeared first on Washington Free Beacon.

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Yet Another Dem Campaign Unionizes

An upstart union aimed at organizing campaign workers has made inroads in Florida. Staffers for Democratic state representative David Richardson's congressional campaign have joined the Campaign Workers Guild. Richardson, who is seeking to fill the seat of retiring Republican representative Ileana Ros-Lehtinan, is the 18th Democratic candidate in the country and the first in Florida to unionize in the 2018 election cycle. The movement appears to be growing. "Through a tough contract fight, workers for David Richardson stood together and fought hard to win a fair contract," Guild president Laura Reimers said in a statement to Florida reporters. "I am tremendously proud to have all of these workers in our fight. Their example will pave the way for campaign workers across the country who are finally getting to experience what it feels like to bargain collectively, stand together, and improve their working conditions." Staffers who supported the union said winning a contract with the Richardson campaign was a tough battle. His field organizer Melissa Mihm told the Miami Herald they had to fight "tooth and nail" to organize. "As the first campaign to unionize in Florida, I can't say this enough: Don't give up. Campaign workers deserve the same rights as all workers, and it's our turn to make history," Melissa Mihm told the Herald. Neither the guild nor the Richardson campaign returned request for comment. The guild has made hypocrisy a major selling point in their outreach to campaign staffs. The union maintains that Democratic candidates are guilty of hypocrisy if they praise organized labor in speeches and cash their campaign contributions without providing their own staffers with collective bargaining. "Campaigns cannot fully fight for workers’ rights while they’re exploiting their own campaign staff," the guild says on its website. "Pro-labor candidates must hire unionized organizers; if they don't, they're not pro-labor." Republican organizations are also attempting to use the guild as a wedge issue between Democratic candidates and one of the most influential portions of its base. The Republican Governors Association greeted the news of Richardson's unionization by asking whether other Democratic candidates would follow suit. "If these candidates want to present themselves as pro-union, then they need to explain to voters why they refuse to put their principles into practice," the RGA said in a Wednesday email blast. Not every campaign professional is convinced that campaign workers need to unionize. A veteran GOP campaign staffer said the plights of staffers pales in comparison to the hardships faced by laborers in the early 20th century when factory workers faced hazards beyond "paper cuts from canvassing sheets and damage to vocal cords from too many phone calls." He also said it would needlessly disrupt campaign activities in the closing days of a race. "Campaigning is tough and stressful, but we've come a long way from the original intent of unions," he said. The post Yet Another Dem Campaign Unionizes appeared first on Washington Free Beacon.

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Sanders on Potential 2020 Howard Schultz Presidential Run: I Don’t Know Him ‘At All’

Sen. Bernie Sanders (I., Vt.) said Thursday that he didn't know outgoing Starbucks executive chairman Howard Schultz, indicating he was unable to comment on rumors the businessman might run as a Democrat to challenge President Donald Trump in 2020. CNN host Chris Cuomo asked Sanders, a self described Democratic Socialist, about Schultz's criticism of far-left policies, including single-payer health care. Schultz, who also served as Starbucks CEO from 1986-2000 and again from 2008-2017, said he was concerned by Democrats who embraced such policies but were unable to say how those policies would be funded. "Now, Bernie Sanders isn't going to like the spirit of that statement, but what do you think of the lineup of a Schultz as kind of the Left's Trump, to go up against him, businessman versus businessman?" Cuomo asked. "Chris, I honestly do not know Mr. Schultz at all," Sanders said. "All that I can say is I think-" "What do you think of the comment?" Cuomo asked. "Well I think his comment is dead wrong," Sanders said. "I think you have a guy who thinks that the United States apparently should remain the only major country on Earth not to guarantee health care to all people." Sanders went on to defend his universal health care proposal, "Medicare for all," which was a key part of his platform during the 2016 Democratic presidential primary. Sanders ultimately lost his bid for the Democratic nomination to Hillary Clinton. It was reported earlier this month that Schultz would retire from Starbucks by the end of the month, and he has made comments to the media that indicate potential interest in a political future. Schultz has also been quite critic of Trump. The post Sanders on Potential 2020 Howard Schultz Presidential Run: I Don’t Know Him ‘At All’ appeared first on Washington Free Beacon.

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What Kim Is

"This will not be just a photo op," President Trump said Thursday of his meeting next week with Kim Jong Un. "This will be—at a minimum, we'll start with, perhaps, a good relationship. And that's something that's very important toward the ultimate making of a good deal." Later that day the president added that he might, if things go well, invite Kim to visit him in the United States, perhaps even at the White House. "He has also discussed [possibly] golfing with Kim," a "senior Trump administration official" told the Daily Beast. Golf? Too soon, Mr. President. Unless this is part of a strategy to get under Kim's skin—he'll be uncomfortable, after all, when he hits the links at Mar-a-Lago wearing charcoal fatigues. More likely it's another example of the president's view that relations between leaders are more important than the relationships between states, regimes, cultures, and ideas. You try to woo Xi Jinping with "a most beautiful" piece of chocolate cake, for example. Even if the results are not ultimately what you wished for. Let's remind ourselves of whom, exactly, President Trump plans to meet next week. For Kim Jong Un is no ordinary man. The Dear Leader occupies the summit of a hierarchical system of some 25 million people whose lives are controlled by his central government in Pyongyang. Some years ago, Christopher Hitchens described the ruling juche ideology this way: "It is based on totalitarian ‘military first' mobilization, is maintained by slave labor, and instills an ideology of the most unapologetic racism and xenophobia." He did not mention the troops and artillery North Korea has amassed on its southern border, and the engineers who toil in underground laboratories, building nuclear-tipped missiles capable of reaching South Korea, Japan, Taiwan, and the United States. Kim, his father and grandfather, and the regime they direct have given no indication, ever, that they recognize the dignity and worth of human life. Some 36,000 Americans died fighting off the north and its Chinese ally between 1950 and 1953. The North Korean government caused a famine in the 1990s that killed somewhere between hundreds of thousands and more than one million people. Another hundred thousand or so are imprisoned, right now, in the North Korean gulag where slaves are starved, beaten, tortured, and killed. Even high-ranking officials are subject to "liquidation" by sickening methods, including execution by a firing squad of anti-aircraft batteries. A 2014 U.N. report found that Systematic, widespread, and gross human rights violations have been, and are being, committed by the Democratic People's Republic of Korea, its institutions and officials. In many instances, the violations of human rights found by the Commission constitute crimes against humanity. These are not mere excesses of the state. They are essential components of a political system that has moved far from the ideals on which it claims to be founded. The gravity, scale, and nature of these violations reveal a state that does not have any parallel in the contemporary world. No parallel. And no conscience. From the U.S. State Department's "Country Reports on Human Rights Practices for 2017: The people of North Korea faced egregious human rights violations by the government in nearly all reporting categories including: extrajudicial killings; disappearances; arbitrary arrests and detentions; torture; political prison camps in which conditions were often harsh, life threatening, and included forced and compulsory labor; unfair trials; rigid controls over many aspects of citizens' lives, including arbitrary interference with privacy, family, home, and correspondence, and denial of the freedoms of speech, press, assembly, association, religion, and movement; denial of the ability to choose their government; coerced abortion; trafficking in persons; severe restrictions on worker rights, including denial of the right to organize independent unions and domestic forced labor through mass mobilizations and as a part of the reeducation system. What Kim Jong Un is, is a monster. And that monstrousness informs his statecraft. It influences the means he adopts to remain in power. It leads him to deceive, dissemble, brutalize. And build a nuclear deterrent. Why would he trade it away? Maybe for reassurance—but such pledges can be reversed at a moment's notice. Maybe for a lot of dough—though he always could turn the missile machine back on when and if the money disappeared. Maybe because he felt backed into a corner—but who knows what China, Russia, and Syria have been whispering in his ear. Singapore is an opportunity for Trump to size up an adversary. At best it will inspire Kim to take verifiable steps towards disarmament. At worst, it will send the sort of mixed signal that has led to disaster. But as you watch the proceedings, do not allow the following to happen: Do not permit the smiles and handshakes to obscure the evil reality of Kim Jong Un—or the memory of his victims. The post What Kim Is appeared first on Washington Free Beacon.

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‘Ocean’s 8’ Review

Ocean's 8 is almost certainly the best date movie of the year: It's a clever heist movie that's deeply amusing and features the most entertaining and attractive collection of actresses collected in one spot in a great many years. Men and women alike will find plenty to love. Word of mouth is going to be great. I promise you this: It's going to be a huge hit. See it now before one of your colleagues spoils the ending. Debbie Ocean (Sandra Bullock) is wrapping up a five-year stretch in the clink as the movie begins, slipping out of her prison gear and into a sleek black number that suggests she got pinched at a cocktail party. That guess isn't far off, as we'll see; more distressing than her ensemble, at least for audiences, is the news that her brother, Danny (played by George Clooney in the 2001 remake of Ocean's 11), has died while she's in jail. Debbie suspects a con but doesn't have too much time to worry about it, given the fact that she's putting together a con of her own: a diamond heist during the world's biggest party, the Met Gala. And she's going to need some friends to help her pull it off: the general raconteur, Lou (Cate Blanchett); the fence, Tammy (Sarah Paulson); the diamond cutter, Amita (Mindy Kaling); the hacker, Nine-Ball (Rihanna); the pickpocket, Constance (Awkwafina); and the deeply in debt dress designer, Rose Weil (Helena Bonham-Carter). But wait, that's only … hold on, where are my fingers … one, two … seven! And this is Ocean's 8. They'll need one more to round out the team: a dupe to wear the $150 million Cartier necklace the gang has targeted for theft. They choose as their stooge Daphne Kluger (Anne Hathaway), a tabloid-obsessed A-list starlet set to be the belle of the ball. Everyone in this film is perfectly cast, but Hathaway's turn is a real treat. I've taken to calling her "America's Sweetheart" as a means of counteracting the ways in which the nastier corners of the internet seem obsessed with taking her down a peg. "Hathahaters" are a very real, and very cruel, phenomenon: everything from her award-winning performances to her striking looks to the hats she wore whilst out and about with loved ones have come in for the ugliest of criticism. Hathaway leans into that social-media-created phenomenon in Ocean's 8, playing up the perceptions that she's a manipulative drama queen with giant features who has no female friends and whose ambitions come off as more than a little grotesque. With any luck, Hathaway's numerous enemies will be forced to reconsider the toxic manner in which she has been treated by the online hordes. One final word of advice: feel free to ignore anyone who, sight-unseen, starts complaining about "gender flipping" with regard to this movie. A part of me understands the wariness: 2016's Ghostbusters, to which Ocean's 8 is unfortunately drawing comparisons, was terrible, unfunny schlock; its director seemed dead set on antagonizing potential viewers and fans of the franchise; and we were all correct in hating one of that year's biggest flops. Ocean's 8, on the other hand, feels much more comfortable in its own skin. It knows what it is, whom it has to appeal to, and what sort of things the viewers who come to an Ocean's movie want to see. It doesn't take itself too seriously as a Vehicle For Progress: Debbie even cracks a joke about the lunacy of suggesting that she will set an example for little girls all around the world who hope to one day grow up and become con artists and diamond thieves themselves. Ocean's 8 is something far more important than a moral lesson or an agent of change: it's a nice little piece of storytelling that'll amuse you for a couple hours. You can't ask for much more than that from a summer blockbuster. The post ‘Ocean’s 8’ Review appeared first on Washington Free Beacon.

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Red Cross: Aid Workers Being Used As a ‘Pawn’ In Yemen’s Civil War

Warring sides in Yemen have increasingly used international aid workers as a "pawn" in the country's three-year civil war, the International Committee of the Red Cross said Thursday after removing 71 employees from the country amid security concerns. The aid group warned the staff relocations from Yemen to Djibouti would cripple its surgical, water, and food assistance programs, and called on all parties to the conflict to institute security guarantees. About 450 ICRC workers remain in Yemen, but ICRC spokeswoman Marie-Claire Feghali said the organization could pull out additional employees in the coming days if security threats continue. "What is very obvious to us now is that we are being instrumentalized as a pawn in the conflict by both sides and we cannot accept that," Feghali told the Washington Free Beacon. "[The combatants] have in their hands the power to influence how many people we pull out and how many people we keep in Yemen, but today the picture is looking extremely bad. I cannot say if we will keep more people tomorrow." The ICRC has been on high alert since the fatal shooting of humanitarian worker, Hanna Lahoud, on April 21. Lahoud, a Lebanese national, was on his way to visit a prison on behalf of the aid group in the southwestern Yemeni city of Taiz when unknown gunmen attacked his car. "Since the killing of Hanna in April, the signals that we are receiving from everyone are that there's a certain leniency and acceptance to the fact that international organizations can be targeted and can be used by one side against the other and we refuse to do that and we refuse to put people at risk," Feghali said. The Yemen civil war, now in its fourth year, has pit a Saudi-led coalition, backed by the United States, against the Iranian aligned Houthi rebels in a war to restore the United Nations-recognized government in the capital, Sana'a. Millions of people are at risk of starvation and the population has suffered from the reemergence of preventable diseases due in large part to combatants who have blocked access to food and medical supplies. A peace plan recently drafted by the UN urges the Houthis to relinquish its ballistic missiles in exchange for an end to the Saudi-led bombing campaign, Reuters reported Wednesday. The post Red Cross: Aid Workers Being Used As a ‘Pawn’ In Yemen’s Civil War appeared first on Washington Free Beacon.

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U.S. Rebukes Nicaragua Over Killings of Protesters 

Human rights organizations in Washington and Nicaragua are documenting allegations of human rights violations following the deaths of at least 113 people protesting the Daniel Ortega regime in the political uprising that began two months ago, according to sources familiar with the investigations. A group of Nicaraguan college students traveled to Washington this week to ask for assistance from President Trump and Congress in toppling the regime. The students, who have emerged as the most effective opposition to Ortega, are sharing alarming new details about the deaths of fellow students killed in protests by national police. The students also are expressing concern that foreign actors from Cuba and Venezuela are helping the Nicaraguan government provoke violence among students attempting to hold peaceful protests against the Ortega regime, according to an attorney who met with the students. The lethal attacks against the students have become such a threat that the Catholic church issued a warning to priests and bishops who have sheltered the young people that their lives too are now in danger, the sources told the Washington Free Beacon. The Vatican News service also reported that the Episcopal Conference of Managua has denounced the death threats against bishops and priests, specifically bishops in the Archdiocese of Managua. Rep. Ileana Ros-Lehtinen (D., Fla.), an outspoken critic of the Ortega regime, has been a vocal advocate for the students. Ros-Lehtinen has been pressing the Senate to pass its version of the Nicaraguan Investment Conditionality Act, an effort to shut down Nicaragua’s access to international loans from the World Bank and International Monetary Fund. She authored a similar bill in the House, but the Senate legislation, coauthored by Sens. Ted Cruz (R., Texas) and Patrick Leahy (D., Vt.), has been stuck in the upper chamber. Secretary of State Pompeo responded on Thursday to the outcry from the Nicaraguan students and several members of Congress over allegations of intentional killings of student protesters by Nicaraguan national police and others supporting the Ortega regime. The State Department restricted the visas of several Nicaraguan officials, including those in the National Police, the Ministry of Health, and other municipal officials, for "directing or overseeing violence against others exercising their rights of peaceful assembly and freedom of expression, thereby undermining Nicaragua’s democracy." "The political violence by police and pro-government thugs against the people of Nicaragua, particularly university students, shows blatant disregard for human rights and is unacceptable," State Department spokeswoman Heather Nauert said in a release. The action prevents those involved with directing the violence from traveling to the United States. "These officials have operated with impunity across the country, including in Managua, Leon, Esteli and Matagalpa," Nauert said, declining to name the individuals impacted because of U.S. visa confidentiality laws. "We are sending a clear message: human rights abusers and those who undermine democracy are not welcome in the United States," she added. During a general assembly meeting of the Organization of American States on Monday, Pompeo used part of his speech to demand that the Ortega government respond to the Nicaraguan people's demands for democratic reform and "hold accountable those responsible for violence." A bipartisan group of U.S. lawmakers, led by Ros-Lehtinen and Sen. Marco Rubio (R., Fla.) earlier this week, wrote a letter to Trump urging him to sanction key Nicaraguan officials, including Francisco Diaz, the deputy commissioner of the National Police and "de facto director," for allegations of personal corruption under the Global Magnitsky Human Rights Accountability Act. Last month, Ortega sought to make unilateral changes to the country's social security program that, "because of corruption and mismanagement has been running a deficit," the lawmakers wrote. Massive protests erupted after news broke that Ortega would require employers to contribute a higher portion of workers’ salaries toward making up the gap, the lawmakers wrote. "In response, Ortega unleashed the government's National Police on these protesters," the lawmakers wrote. The lawmakers, citing media reports, also noted an incident on May 9, 2018 when a group of police officers attacked the residents of a small community in Managua. "Journalists who were covering the incident were threatened by 30 armed National Police officers," they said. "Francisco Diaz made a statement saying the police were only monitoring traffic and that four members of the patrol were hurt by bullets. Eyewitnesses denied his version of the story." "Elsewhere at least three students were allegedly killed for taking part in protests around the Polytechnic University and National University," they added. "The Associated Press confirmed the mobilization of police against the protestors. Francisco Diaz denied any policy presence in the area, according to the Washington Post." Besides Ros-Lehtinen and Rubio, lawmakers singing the letter to Trump included: Sens. Ted Cruz (R., Texas) and Bill Nelson (D., Fla.), along with Reps. Elliot Engel (D., N.Y.), Albio Sires (D., N.J.), Paul Cook (R., Calif.), Debbie Wasserman Shultz (D., Fla.), Norma Torres (D., Calif.), Michael Conway (R., Texas), Mario Diaz-Balart (R., Fla.), and Carlos Curbelo (R., Fla.). The post U.S. Rebukes Nicaragua Over Killings of Protesters appeared first on Washington Free Beacon.

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Trump, Congressional Leadership Agree VA Expansion Will Be Paid For

The Trump administration is seeking to pay for recent expansion of Veterans Affairs to private health care through recently increased budgetary caps, according to an administration official. The VA Mission Act, signed into law by the president on Wednesday, creates a new program that allows veterans to seek private care. The law calls for billions for new programs to provide private care, but does not outline how they will be funded. The Washington Post reported the White House is working against funding the new law. However, the White House and the Republican congressional leadership both support securing funding for the VA expansion. "The committee will continue to work with the White House in finding the path forward to secure and fund the best care for our veterans," said David Popp, a spokesman for Senate majority leader Mitch McConnell (R., Ky.). "It's not a question of whether this important priority will get funded. It will be resolved during the upcoming appropriations process." An administration official told the Washington Free Beacon the White House is committed to funding health care for current and future heroes and said the expansion can be paid for under existing spending caps. Speaker of the House Paul Ryan's office confirmed Ryan (R., Wis.) agrees with the White House that the new veterans programs should be paid for with existing funds, rather than increasing spending. A proposal introduced by Sen. Richard Shelby (R., Ala.) and Patrick Leahy (D., Vt.) would create $50 billion in new spending to address the health care expansion. However, the administration says the creation of new funding is unnecessary and can be taken elsewhere from existing appropriations, after Congress recently approved a $67 billion increase in spending for nondefense programs in fiscal year 2019. The official added that the White House strongly supports creating a new, consolidated community care program for veterans' health care. President Trump's budget for FY 2019 funded the program under the nondefense discretionary cap, while providing $83.1 billion for the VA, an 11.7 percent increase from 2017. Of that, $73.1 billion would go toward health care services for veterans. The Community Care Program, which was created by the Mission Act, accounts for $14.2 billion of the president's VA budget. The post Trump, Congressional Leadership Agree VA Expansion Will Be Paid For appeared first on Washington Free Beacon.

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Dunford to Meet With Russian Military Leaders to Discuss Syria

Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff Gen. Joseph Dunford will meet with Russian military leaders on Friday in Helsinki to discuss the situation in Syria among other matters. Chief of the general staff of the Russian armed forces Gen. Valery Gerasimov will represent the Russian government in what will be the third face-to-face meetings between the two generals, the Department of Defense announced. U.S. Air Force Col. Patrick Ryder released a written statement on Thursday announcing the upcoming meetings. "The two military leaders will discuss the deconfliction of coalition and Russian operations in Syria and exchange views on the state of U.S.-Russia military relations and the current international security situation in Europe and other key regions," Ryder said. It is not expected that any increase in military cooperation is expected to result from the meeting. Russia has a large military presence in Syria already, working with the regime of Syrian dictator Bashar al-Assad. However, they have spent little effort combating terror groups such as the Islamic State and instead has focused on rebel groups, some of which are supported by the United States. The United States and Russia occasionally do communicate and notify one another of military operations they are conducting in the region. Additionally, Russian troops are in parts of Georgia and Eastern Ukraine. The United States has provided aid to both countries, to help them counter Russian forces. Officials say Russia's actions have made it impossible for military cooperation between the two countries. The meeting in Finland does not portend increased military cooperation between the United States and Russia, Joint Staff officials said. Russian actions in Georgia – where it invaded and still occupies the provinces of Abkhazia and South Ossetia — and its annexation of the Ukraine province of Crimea make any cooperation between the two countries impossible, officials said. Russia also has troops in Eastern Ukraine and continues to foment unrest in the country. Dunford met earlier on Thursday with Gen. Jarmo Lindberg, his Finnish counterpart to discuss cooperation between the two countries. The post Dunford to Meet With Russian Military Leaders to Discuss Syria appeared first on Washington Free Beacon.

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Nicolle Wallace Asks if Trump Women Are ‘Dead Inside,’ ‘Paid Off’

MSNBC host Nicolle Wallace asked panelists on Thursday if the Trump women are "dead inside" and "paid off" given they don't stand up to the President Donald Trump and behavior deemed unacceptable. Although Wallace claimed she would "never play a moral policewoman," she continued on to judge the president's behavior, comments made by Trump attorney Rudy Giuliani about adult film actress Stormy Daniels, and the perceived lack of reactions from First Lady Melania Trump and the president's daughter and advisor Ivanka Trump. Wallace asked Vanity Fair reporter Emily Jane Fox how Ivanka and Melania Trump likely respond to news like that of Giuliani saying he didn't "respect" Story Daniels. "Well, let me ask you, you know more about the Trump women, the Trump family than anyone. What do they do on a day like the today?" Wallace said. "Are they just the most stoic human beings, are they numb, are they dead inside, are they paid off? What's their deal?" "Yes, yes, and yes. I think they do not see President Trump the way that all of us see President Trump," Fox said. "They have such a distorted image of who he is that they don't have the kind of reaction that we do. It's almost some sort of trick or spell he has on them" "Ivanka Trump is the most masterful compartmentalizer that America has maybe ever seen," Fox added. Prior to the discussion of the Trump women, Fox and Wallace honed in on the views exposed by Trump and Guiliani. "But the President has incredibly sexist, misogynistic views about how he treats women in general," Fox said, arguing his behavior was in line with perceived "disgusting" comments Guiliani made about Daniels. "What [Giuliani] said about Stormy Daniels was disgusting, gave me a pit in my stomach from the second I woke up this morning," she added. Guiliani said during an event this week in Tel Aviv that he doesn't have the same level of respect for a porn star as he does for some other women. "I don't respect a porn star the way I respect a career woman or a woman of substance or a woman who … isn't going to sell her body for sexual exploitation," Giuliani said. The post Nicolle Wallace Asks if Trump Women Are ‘Dead Inside,’ ‘Paid Off’ appeared first on Washington Free Beacon.

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