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Hawley Campaign Not Buying McCaskill’s ‘Classified’ Reason for No Vote on Haspel

Republican Josh Hawley's campaign is keeping the pressure on Sen. Claire McCaskill (D., Mo.) over her vote against confirming CIA director Gina Haspel, who was officially instated on Monday. McCaskill is working to evade the charge that her vote against Haspel was based on partisan politics by saying she had real concerns about Haspel that she can't disclose because they're based on classified material. "I cross-examined her on the classified material," McCaskill said over the weekend, "and I was very uncomfortable with her answers." "I wish I could explain to all my constituents the details of all that, but the law will not allow me to do so," she said. "I can tell you this, if everyone in Missouri read and listened to her answers to the questions I asked, I believe that a vast majority of Missourians would have voted the same way I did." The Hawley campaign says it's not buying McCaskill's assurance that a majority of Missourians would agree with her if they knew her secret reason for opposing Haspel. The campaign pointed to support for Haspel by Sen. Mark Warner (D., Va.), the top Democrat on the Senate Select Committee on Intelligence, as evidence that there were no legitimate concerns raised regarding Haspel from the classified material on her. "The number one ranking Democrat on the Senate Intelligence Committee voted for Gina Haspel," said campaign spokesperson Kelli Ford. "He has read everything anyone can read." "If Warner can vote for her, so should Senator McCaskill," Ford said. Hawley has used McCaskill's vote against Haspel, who was pushed over the confirmation threshold by support from six Democrats, to label her "a hard partisan who only cares about obstructing the Trump agenda." Republican senator Tom Cotton (Ark.) similarly criticized McCaskill for prioritizing "partisan politics over national security." "McCaskill proved once again that she is so liberal, and so reflexively opposed to the president that she cannot represent Missourians in the Senate," Cotton said. McCaskill is viewed as one of the most vulnerable senators up for reelection in 2018 due to the wide margin of President Trump’s victory in the state in 2016. Polls show a tight race between McCaskill and Hawley, Missouri's current attorney general. The post Hawley Campaign Not Buying McCaskill’s ‘Classified’ Reason for No Vote on Haspel appeared first on Washington Free Beacon.

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Israelis Respond to Biased Coverage of Gaza Riots

TEL AVIV, Israel—A couple of weeks before the Gaza riots began, the pro-Israel media watchdog CAMERA put up across from the New York Times building a massive billboard: "The New York Times At it AGAIN: Defaming Israel with distorted ‘news.'" Although its strategic location made it impossible to miss, Israelis nearly universally agree that the Old Gray Lady didn't get the message—and that the Times is but one of a slew of global media outlets copying from the same script, according to which IDF soldiers randomly kill peaceful protesters. While the Israeli public is accustomed to anti-Israel bias in the international media, coverage of the Gaza riots appears to have a struck a nerve, perhaps because foreign coverage of "peaceful protests" is so at odds with what Israelis see on their local TV. On Israeli TV they see swastika-painted kite bombs setting alight Israeli fields, bullets lodged into the window sills of nearby Sderot homes, Hamas fence-cutting units crying "Khaybar, Khaybar"—a battle cry referring to the Muslim massacre of Jews in that Arabian town in 628 A.D. When these aspects of the story don't make it to Western media outlets, Israelis are understandably aggrieved. Nizar Amer, a deputy spokesperson at Israel's foreign ministry, says that from the Israeli government's point of view, most of the coverage in the international media fails to provide the full picture. "You didn't see many media outlets saying that Hamas led and organized this campaign. There's a gap between what's happening on the ground and what the media is reporting." A pundit on Israel’s Channel 20, a news channel with a nationalistic bent, argued that the country should start ejecting journalists who print falsehoods about Israel. Amer says given the importance of freedom of the press, he doesn't see Israel doing that. Israelis rarely agree on anything political, so it's surprising the extent to which Israelis agree on the subject of media bias. Michal Har-Tal, a 30-year-old biologist and research assistant who voted for the far left Meretz Party in the last few elections, says she normally tries "not to dwell" on the media's anti-Israel narrative. But a Buzzfeed headline calling Israel's actions a "massacre" was too much for her, particularly after Hamas admitted that 50 of the 62 people shot by Israeli soldiers were Hamas operatives, suggesting that far from committing a massacre the IDF had been remarkably precise in its targeting. (Later it was revealed that another three were members of Islamic Jihad.) Har-Tal was so upset that for the first time she wrote a letter to Buzzfeed’s editors. Her letter read in part: "Israeli soldiers do not thrive on shooting innocent Palestinians or even Hamas activists. However, it is their job to protect the state of Israel and its citizens from attacks. And when the protesters (and militants hiding among them) get too close or throw things or try to set bombs, Israeli soldiers react. Unfortunately, people get shot and killed. But this is not a massacre. When Hamas militants infiltrate houses of Jews and murder them, that's a massacre. When terrorists attack churches, shopping malls, crowded markets, etc., that's a massacre. These kinds of ‘sensational' headlines are misleading and hinder your journalistic integrity." The media coverage sometimes causes splits within families, particularly when they are divided between Israel and the diaspora. Stanley Dalnekoff, an Orthodox Jew and retired owner of a travel business, immigrated to Jerusalem with his family three years ago. His wife’s cousin recently sent him an excited note saying the move to make Jerusalem the capital "is creating major upset," "we are reading about major human rights abuses," and this is "against the precepts of Torah." Here is part of Dalnekoff's reply: "[N]ot one of our critics tells us what to do when tens of thousands of hate filled demonstrators wish to break through our borders and spread death and destruction in their wake. The total annihilation of the state of Israel is the only agenda of Hamas and its supporters.… I don't think that you have any right to morally judge us. Indeed, what really saddens me is the total ignorance you and those who think like you have of Jewish history. If you did have this understanding then instead of questioning such things as the American Embassy move to Israel you would hail it as another step in the 3,000 year aspirations of your people. With almost 50 percent of world Jewry now living in Israel, it is time for diaspora Jewry and especially American Jews to wake up and smell the coffee! It is time for them to feel pride in our achievements and overcome what I see is a growing feeling of self-hatred." Helen Har-Tal, Michal's mother, a job developer in Tel-Aviv who made Aliyah (immigrated) from America decades ago, says there is a limit to what Israel can do to counter foreign-media distortions. "No matter what Israel says, everybody's talking about babies being shot. Nobody's asking ‘Why would a mother or grandmother bring a baby to a place where live ammunition is being shot?' Nobody asks that question." She feels that the real impact is outside of Israel. "All you have to do is look at what's happening to the Jews in Europe. Look at what’s happening to Jewish students on American campuses." Michal agrees with her mother. "It keeps feeding the fire of BDS. The perception is that to be a liberal you have to be anti-Israel." The Har-Tals have a point. Thousands of Jews are moving from France to Israel because of rising anti-Semitism, and Britain's Jews may be next now that anti-Semitic ideas have been openly embraced by members of Britain’s Labour Party. Freddy Vangas, a designer who immigrated from Colombia 25 years ago, echoes these sentiments. He says biased media coverage feeds anti-Semitic trends in the rest of the world and hardens attitudes toward Israel among the general population. Unlike Har-Tal, however, he is optimistic that it is within Israel’s power to change things for the better. "It's already happening," he said. "When Netanyahu showed the world the information about Iran’s nuclear program, this was a start. It showed the world that we are right, that we are not lying about the situation. I believe it will be a turning point." Rabbi Zev M. Shandalov expresses similar optimism. He moved to Israel from Chicago with his wife and three daughters nine years ago. He found the recent coverage by New York's Daily News the most egregious. (The paper showed a picture of a smiling, beautifully dressed Ivanka Trump at the ceremony opening the American embassy. In real life she was pointing to the bronze plate with details of the opening, but the Daily News had her pointing to a picture of demonstrators being shot in Gaza.) But he says that the media's reportage shifted after 48 hours from the worst of the Gaza riots on May 14. He says it went from "hang Israel to Hamas has blood on their hands." He partly attributes the shift to Hamas’s own admission that those who were killed were overwhelmingly its own operatives. ‘I was pleasantly surprised and pleased to see that the newspapers, when they get the facts, are willing to say the right thing," Shandalov said. Still, he admitted, for the media's consumers, as in most things: "First impressions are the most important." The post Israelis Respond to Biased Coverage of Gaza Riots appeared first on Washington Free Beacon.

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Unions Steamrolling Quickie Elections

President Obama's rules speeding up the union election process increased the chances of union victory, according to a new analysis. Union victories in secret ballot elections have held steady since the Democrat-controlled National Labor Relations Board amended its election rules to fast-track union votes and increase the personal information companies must give to labor organizers. The shortened window between filing for an election and holding one, however, may be propping up union success, according to an analysis from management-side law firm Fisher Phillips. When the NLRB, which oversees union elections, schedule elections within a two-week period, unions emerge victorious nearly 83 percent of the time. Their success rate plummets if employees are given more time to weigh the potential benefits and costs of exclusive union representation. "When elections happen in 14 days or less, unions win at higher rates, 82.4 percent compared to 66.6 percent," the analysis found. "Meanwhile, management win rates have remained virtually unchanged from 32.9 percent in 2014-2015 to 33.2 percent in 2017-2018." Unions typically have an advantage in elections because they are unlikely to petition if they do not think they can prevail. Labor groups won 69 percent of union elections in 2017, on par with historic rates, though it ticked up from unions' 64 percent win rate in 2013, the year before new rules were adopted, according to the NLRB. Union gains have increased sharply for small businesses which may not have labor attorneys on-hand to guide them through the process, according to Fisher Phillips' Steve Bernstein. "Before the rule was changed, the union-win rate for bargaining units with 25 or less people was 69 percent. In the three years since, the win rate went up to 74 percent," he said. Management-side attorneys and employers have protested the Obama administration election rules, which went into effect after the president vetoed a congressional resolution intended to block the sped-up timeframe. Unions can spend years organizing secret-ballot elections, but employers can run afoul of labor law for making the case against unionization outside of the formal election period. Elections now move at a faster pace. NLRB data show voting begins an average of 23 days after a petition, a 40 percent reduction from the 38 days it took before the rules were adopted. Bernstein said the effects are most pronounced in small businesses where employers may not have time to train supervisors and middle management to comply with labor law, as well as the confusion concerning which employees are able to vote in the election. The win-rate nationwide may be the same, but the new rules have given labor organizers a larger window to dispute results and overturn losses. "That's not something that's going to show up in election results [statistics], but can show up in unfair labor practice complaints," Bernstein said. "It's very tough for an employer to deal with these issues in real time.… It's been a recipe for confusion." The NLRB is currently reviewing nearly 7,000 public comments submitted by union advocates, employers, and labor law experts on both sides to revisit the rule. The timetable on any revision is flexible—the agency extended the comment deadline from March to April previously—as officials and board members weigh the issue. The post Unions Steamrolling Quickie Elections appeared first on Washington Free Beacon.

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DCCC Comms Director Admits Voters in Swing Districts Don’t Care About Russia

Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee (DCCC) communications director Meredith Kelly admitted on Monday night that voters in swing districts don't care about the Russia investigation involving President Donald Trump. Fox News host Martha MacCallum said that the DCCC must have a tough time getting their message out with all the news coverage of Special Counsel Robert Mueller's investigation into Russian interference in the 2016 election. Many Democrats and members of the media have speculated that Russia colluded with Trump's presidential campaign, a charge the president has dismissed. "Russia is certainly a big topic and this investigation is one that a lot of people are focused on, but Democratic candidates all across the country are actually talking directly to voters about the issues that impact their everyday lives," Kelly said. Kelly said Democratic candidates are starting to break though the Russia coverage by talking about issues like affordable healthcare, jobs, and higher wages. MacCallum followed up to ask Kelly whether voters care about the Russia investigation. "Do you know a lot of people that care about Russia when you talk to folks who are out there in the country? Do they care?" MacCallum asked. "It's not the first, second, or third thing that voters are telling us in the House battlefield in these swing districts," Kelly said. "I think people want this investigation to go unimpeded, but they really care about those pocketbook issues and that's what Democratic candidates are trying to focus on." Kelly's comment echoes what CNN reporter Maeve Reston said back in January about people not caring about the Russia investigation. "Remember, even in 2016 when we went out to these swing states and talked to voters, there was still this fear that things were suddenly going to turn down again," Reston said. "You don't feel that as much anymore. And I'm so interested to see how the Russia investigation affects things, because so far, out in these districts when you talk to people about Russia – and that's all we talk about at CNN basically – they say they don't care." "It doesn't have any effect on their lives," Reston added. The post DCCC Comms Director Admits Voters in Swing Districts Don’t Care About Russia appeared first on Washington Free Beacon.

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Murphy: Republicans Wouldn’t Act on Guns Even if a School Shooter Killed 100 People

Republicans wouldn't bring a debate on gun violence to the floor even if a school shooter killed 100 people, Sen. Chris Murphy (D., Conn.) said Monday. Three months after the high school massacre in Parkland, Florida, that left 17 dead, a school shooter in Santa Fe, Texas, killed 10 on Friday. Murphy, a gun control advocate who supports an assault weapons ban, told MSNBC host Chris Hayes the GOP wouldn't want to expose their members to a tough vote to address the issue. "Is Congress any closer to doing anything now than in the days after the Parkland massacre?" Hayes asked. "I think a shooter could walk into a school and kill 100 people, and Republicans wouldn't bring a debate on gun violence before the House of Representatives or the Senate," Murphy said. "I think Republicans have made it very clear that they have no intention to debate the issue of gun violence in the Senate or the House before the midterms." Murphy said the silence of Congress gave mass shooters "an effective green light." "I really do believe that these very troubled young men who are contemplating mass acts of violence notice that the highest levels of government have offered no meaningful condemnation to the acts of previous shooters, and in their minds, they pervert that silence into permission," he said. The post Murphy: Republicans Wouldn’t Act on Guns Even if a School Shooter Killed 100 People appeared first on Washington Free Beacon.

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Progressive Nebraska House Candidate Advocates Assault Weapons Ban and Buyback Program

Democratic House candidate Kara Eastman said Monday that a gun buyback program would be "great" as part of larger gun control overhaul. MSNBC host Katy Tur asked inquired about the assault weapons ban Eastman supports, leading Eastman to tout "common-sense gun safety regulation." Tur pressed her to answer what should be done about assault weapons specifically, and Eastman said she would support a buyback program. "What do you think of the assault weapons already out there. Would you want them to be turned in?" Tur asked. "I think if we could create some sort of buyback program, that would be great," Eastman answered. Eastman also said "our children are being braver than policy makers," and she suggested legislating universal background checks. "I think that our children are being braver than policy makers when it comes the these issues. There are some low hanging fruit when it comes to common-sense gun safety regulation," Eastman said. "We need to acknowledge there are responsible gun owners out there but we also need to keep guns out of the hands of people who are going to use them in the wrong way." Eastman narrowly beat former Rep. Brad Ashford, who enjoyed the support of the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee. During her appearance on "Meet the Press Daily," Eastman also discussed abortion, which she supports without any restrictions. National Republican Congressional Committee spokesman Jack Pandol said Eastman is "too radical" for Nebraska. "Even Democrats agree Kara Eastman is just too radical for Nebraska. This troubling answer is the latest example of why we can’t afford Kara and her extreme agenda," Pandol said. Eastman is running against Republican Rep. Don Bacon, who ran unopposed in his party primary. The post Progressive Nebraska House Candidate Advocates Assault Weapons Ban and Buyback Program appeared first on Washington Free Beacon.

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Progressive Nebraska House Candidate Doesn’t Say There Should Be Limits on Abortion

Kara Eastman, the progressive Democratic candidate that won the party primary last week in Nebraska, said Monday she did not support any federal restrictions on abortion. Eastman appeared on MSNBC's "Meet the Press Daily" to discuss several issues, including gun control, immigration, and abortion. She did not endorse any restrictions to abortion at all when Tur asked her directly. "On abortion, should there be any limits on abortion?" host Katy Tur asked. "I do not believe that the federal government should tell women what to do with their bodies," Eastman replied. "I think women are capable of making those decisions. Those are really hard decisions to make, but they should be made between a healthcare provider, a woman's family, and her faith. We should leave it to women to decide because women should have the right to choose." Eastman's narrow victory over former Rep. Brad Ashford, who was backed by the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee, was a notable upset against the Democratic establishment. Ashford supports some restrictions on abortion while Eastman does not, and Eastman also supports a single-payer healthcare plan, which entails the government paying for abortions. Jack Pandol, a spokesperson for the National Republican Congressional Committee, slammed Eastman by saying that Democrats even believe that she is "too radical" for Nebraska. "Even Democrats agree Kara Eastman is just too radical for Nebraska. This troubling answer is the latest example of why we can’t afford Kara and her extreme agenda," Pandol said. Eastman will face first-term Republican Rep. Don Bacon, who ran unopposed in his party primary. The post Progressive Nebraska House Candidate Doesn’t Say There Should Be Limits on Abortion appeared first on Washington Free Beacon.

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Obama’s Education Secretary Defends Call to Pull Kids Out of School: ‘Less Guns’ Is the Answer

Obama administration Education Secretary Arne Duncan called Friday for pulling students out of school until gun laws change, and Monday, he doubled down in an MSNBC interview. In light of the school shooting in Santa Fe, Texas, Duncan argued that America must "think radically different than we ever have" on gun control. He said that only increased political pressure can create the necessary breakthrough to make schools safe from shooters. "As adults, we're failing to keep our kids safe. We have to create a level of tension, honestly, that will help us break through politically," he said. Duncan said teenagers are leading the charge to finally stand up to lawmakers and bring about the widespread public desire for new gun control laws. "There is not a lack of public will; there is a lack of political leadership. The politicians are way behind where the public is," he said. "The public's now speaking up, led by our teens, saying ‘We're not going to stand by.’ People are finding their voice and they are going to vote." He said politicians who do not support gun control ought to "pay a price at the voting booth," and he specifically named the November midterm elections as the time for that. "Everybody goes to the voting booth in November and politicians who have refused to move, refused to listen, have to pay a price at the voting booth," he said. He also said the NRA is behind Republican proposals to focus on mental health as a way of preventing future shootings. Duncan said he did not want to repeal the Second Amendment but, instead, to find a way to drastically reduce legal gun ownership in order to have "less guns." "The answer is not more guns; it is less guns," he said. "And fewer guns in the hands of people who should not have them." As Duncan described it, no other "civilized nation" has problems with gun violence like the U.S. does. "This is a made-in-America issue. You can draw a direct line to the number of guns we have, the easy access, the easy availability to guns and the number ever children and adults who get killed every single year," he said. When pressed for specific proposals, Duncan named "universal background checks, restricting weapons of war, doing research into the impact on gun violence." Tur and Duncan also discussed how one of the survivors in Santa Fe said she knew her school would be attacked because she had seen other shootings occur around the country. Tur said her mother-in-law, a teacher, had a "sense of inevitability" that her school would eventually see a mass shooting, even though they are exceedingly rare. Duncan also used legislation of automobiles as an example of how driving has been made safer through licensing, speed bumps, and speed limits. He did not mention that Americans are still far more likely to die in automobile deaths than in a shooting. In 2017, the number of automobile deaths vastly exceeded the number of gun homicides; there were about 40,100 automobile deaths in the U.S. in 2017, while the estimated number of gun homicides in 2016 was 11,008, in addition to the 21,386 suicides with a gun. School shootings specifically constitute a much smaller total number of deaths, and the prevalence of school shootings has gone down since the 1990s. The post Obama’s Education Secretary Defends Call to Pull Kids Out of School: ‘Less Guns’ Is the Answer appeared first on Washington Free Beacon.

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Trump Administration Condemns ‘Sham’ Election in Venezuela, Imposes New Sanctions

U.S. government officials on Monday denounced Venezuelan President Nicolas Maduro's declaration of victory in Sunday's election as a fraud and issued new sanctions designed to prevent Maduro from selling off the country's debt to U.S. entities and individuals. President Donald Trump's new executive order bars U.S. citizens from being involved in sales of the country's accounts receivable when it comes to oil and other assets. However, the Trump administration stopped short of slapping tougher direct oil sanctions against the Maduro regime, a step that opposition leaders have pressed for and was widely anticipated to take place in the wake of Maduro's orchestrated victory at the polls. Targeted crude oil sanctions against Venezuela would cripple Maduro's leftist administration, which is entirely dependent on crude sales to prop up its increasingly isolated and insolvent government. President Trump and top administration officials are wary of taking any action that would further hurt the Venezuelan people, who are already suffering from widespread food shortages brought on by the economic crisis. They also don't want to do anything that could increase domestic gasoline prices, which are already experiencing their annual spike ahead of the summer months of heavy vacation driving. Instead, Pompeo declared Sunday's vote a "sham" and suggested the oil sanctions are still on the table for consideration. "Sunday's process was choreographed by a regime too unpopular and afraid of its own people to risk free elections and open competition," Pompeo said, vowing "swift economic and diplomatic actions." Trump followed up by issuing an executive order prohibiting any U.S. person or entity from purchasing any debt owed to the Venezuelan government or any debt that is pledged as collateral to the Maduro regime. That action followed sanctions the administration announced on Friday against Diosdado Cabello, long considered the second-most powerful governing politician in Venezuela and a top Socialist Party figure, and other top Maduro regime officials. The United States accused Cabello of drug trafficking, extortion, money laundering, and embezzling government money. Sen. Marco Rubio (R., Fla.) applauded the new U.S. sanctions and predicted that Maduro would be forced out of power as his country's economic crisis continues to spiral. "Nicolas Maduro told his supports that pulling off a fake election would be a reset that would result in less sanctions and less isolation," Rubio said Monday in a statement. "Instead he faces more sanctions and is more isolated than ever. Maduro's days in power are numbered." Rubio called on leaders of the governing party to remove Maduro and the other criminals from power and create a process for national reconciliation and restoration of the "constitutional democratic order" before "time runs out on them as well." Others continued to press for oil sanctions, which they argued would have the most impact in forcing Maduro from power. Enrique Altimari, an anti-Maduro activist who serves as the Latin American Studies fellow at the Victims of Communism Memorial Foundation, said the Maduro regime would start to feel oil sanctions in three weeks and the financial damage would be unbearable by the third month. "Oil is usually bought in advance, so the impact would be immediate, and within three months, the government would be already seriously damaged," he told the Washington Free Beacon. "The opposition would use, not only for international pressure, but internal pressure to hopefully start a true dialogue to set the terms for [Maduro's] way out of government and out of Venezuela." Altimari also argued that oil sanctions would not intensify the suffering of the Venezuelan people because the Maduro regime uses the oil income to pay itself and the military. "The money is not getting to the Venezuelan families, whatsoever, only to the military and the politically elite—it's the resource the regime uses to survive," he said. "If you take away those funds, you would put him in a very uncomfortable position—he will be unable to pay his payroll of lackeys and people in the military, and they would lose incentive to maintain the Maduro government." On a conference call with reporters Monday, a senior administration official said Trump isn't taking any option off the table, including oil sanctions and a more drastic option of the use of military force. A senior Trump administration official said that 95 percent of the Western Hemisphere is now united against the Maduro regime. "Everybody is truly together on this—there is unity in the hemisphere that is almost unprecedented" in how to deal with this "crisis of democracy." "The region has never seen a kleptocracy like this—a nation as wealthy [as Venezuela is] driven into an economic death spiral so quickly by such a group of individuals determined to enrich themselves at the expense of their people," the official said. The official estimated that nearly 1.5 million Venezuelans have migrated to nearby Colombia and Brazil, a flood of refugees rivaling the exodus of migrants from Syria during the course of the nation's years-long bloody civil war. The United States has provided more than $40 million to help Colombia and other countries in the region deal with the outflow of Venezuelans into nearby countries. U.S. government officials also condemned the Maduro regime's exploitation of the scarcity of food and basic necessities by setting up food stations near polling places and doling out food after presenting their voting cards for inspection, so party organizers can see who voted and who has not. "Everyone who has this card must vote," Maduro open said at rallies before the election. "I give, and you give." Along with the United States and Canada, a group of 14 nations in the Western hemisphere on Monday reacted to Maduro's claims of winning a new six-year term by pledging to limit diplomatic ties and blocking all future loans to Venezuela. The group of Latin American nations, known as the Lima Group, issued a statement saying it "did not recognize the legitimacy of Sunday's vote. The members said they had agreed to take steps so that national and international banks would not offer loans to the Maduro regime unless they had approval from the opposition-held National Assembly. The Maduro government tried to dissolve the National Assembly, which was elected in 2015, and set up a National Constituent Assembly full of supporters to usurp its power. The Lima Group members also said they would recall their ambassadors for consultations about reducing their diplomatic communications with the Maduro regime. The group is made up of Argentina, Brazil, Canada, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, Guatemala, Guyana, Honduras, Mexico, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, and Saint Lucia. The post Trump Administration Condemns ‘Sham’ Election in Venezuela, Imposes New Sanctions appeared first on Washington Free Beacon.

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